International Development, Community, and Environment

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Field pea is grown by smallholder farmers in Ethiopia as a source of food, fodder, income, and soil fertility. This study explores intraspecific diversity of field pea and its contribution to farmers' livelihoods in two agroecological zones of South Tigray and South Wollo, northeastern Ethiopia. Interviews were conducted with 168 farming households. The number of varieties and the Shannon Diversity Index (SDI) were higher in South Tigray (seven varieties, 0.35 SDI) than South Wollo (two varieties, 0.025 SDI). Farmers in South Tigray plant field pea during two growing seasons, allowing for integration of multiple varieties into their farming systems. The price of one field pea type from South Tigray known as “dekoko” was twice as high as other field pea varieties, most likely due to high demand and relatively low supply. Key informants reported “dekoko” has become less common in their communities, with diseases and pests reported as major production constraints. Multistakeholder collaboration is recommended to enhance the contribution of field pea to Ethiopian farming systems.

Publication Title

Legume Science

Publication Date

2-22-2022

Volume

4

Issue

3

First Page

1

Last Page

13

DOI

10.1002/leg3.141

Keywords

agrobiodiversity, crop rotation, farmers' varieties, Pisum sativum, production constraints

Included in

Sociology Commons

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