International Development, Community, and Environment

Title

Compensation for Risks: Host Community Benefits in Siting Locally Unwanted Facilities

Document Type

Article

Abstract

This article analyzes the recent negotiations connected with siting 24 solid-waste landfills in Wisconsin. We examine the association between the type and amount of compensation paid to host communities by facility developers and the size of facilities, certain facility characteristics, the timing of negotiated agreements, the size of the host community, and the socioeconomic status of the host area. Our findings suggest that the level of compensation after adjusting for landfill capacity is positively associated with the percentage of total facility capacity dedicated to host community use, positively associated with the percentage of people of the host area who are in poverty, and larger for public facilities that accept municipal wastes. Other explanatory variables we examined, whose association with levels of compensation proved statistically insignificant, were facility size, facility status (new vs expansion), facility use (countyonly vs multicounty), timing of negotiation, host community size, and the host area education level, population density, and per capita income. We discuss the policy implications of our principal findings and future research questions in light of the persistent opposition surrounding the siting of solid-waste and other waste-management facilities. © 1991 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

Publication Title

Environmental Management

Publication Date

9-1-1991

Volume

15

Issue

5

First Page

647

Last Page

658

ISSN

0364-152X

DOI

10.1007/BF02589624

Keywords

benefits, compensation, negotiations, siting, solid waste, unwanted facilities

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