International Development, Community, and Environment

Title

Foodways Transmission in the Standing Rock Nation

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Effective foodways transmission is critical to maintain the food sovereignty of indigenous peoples. In order to determine their own foodways, indigenous communities have developed diverse systems to convey knowledge related to the procurement, preparation, distribution, and consumption of food. In recent years, community organizations are taking a more active role in facilitating foodways transmission. In the Standing Rock Nation of the northern Great Plains, several community organizations, including tribal government agencies, are creating opportunities for elders to share their knowledge about traditional foods. The impetus for these activities comes from elders themselves, who attribute high rates of diet-related diseases to a loss of knowledge about traditional foods. We conducted eighteen semi-structured interviews with elders and organizers in the midst of these activities to reflect on processes of foodways transmission, including the implications of facilitation by community organizations. Interviews were focused on four human ecological concepts: perception and diversity; human ecological relations; context; and practical wisdom. Insights generated through our discussions were immediately applicable to the ongoing activities in Standing Rock and can inform elders and community organizations leading similar efforts in other communities. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

Publication Title

Food and Foodways

Publication Date

10-1-2013

Volume

21

Issue

4

First Page

315

Last Page

339

ISSN

0740-9710

DOI

10.1080/07409710.2013.850007

Keywords

United States, Great Plains, Native Americans, folk craft, food craft, transmission, role of elders

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