International Development, Community, and Environment

Title

The cognitive relevance of Indigenous and rural: Why is it critical to survival?

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Using two case studies of children’s knowledge, this paper sheds light on the value, diversity, and necessity of Indigenous and place-based knowledge to science and engineering curricula in rural areas. Rural contexts are rich environments for cultivating contextual knowledge, hence framing a critical pedagogy of teaching and learning. Indigenous and rural place-based knowledge are nuanced and pragmatic in character, and offer solutions to both local and global challenges. Two case studies, drawn from the experience of Lakota and Dakota communities and rural New York State, demonstrate the need to conserve, transmit, and contribute to Indigenous and rural knowledge through experiential and place-based education that bridges the gap between children’s knowledge and global STEM. This knowledge is inherently diverse in its complexity and connectivity to habitat, and when viewed in this light, has the capacity to transform our perspectives on educational practices and policies as well as our overall outlook on conserving both ecological as well as cultural diversity worldwide. Because diversity and knowledge are necessary for the survival of life on this planet, an enriched concept of pedagogical pluralism, in terms of multiple ways of knowing, is a necessity.

Publication Title

Cultural Studies of Science Education

Publication Date

3-1-2017

Volume

12

Issue

1

First Page

97

Last Page

118

ISSN

1871-1502

DOI

10.1007/s11422-016-9745-5

Keywords

children’s rural knowledge, diversity, Indigenous knowledge, Lakota and Dakota, practical wisdom (phronesis)

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